Reported Cases of Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) in the United States

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Since mid-May 2020, CDC has been tracking reports of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C), a rare but serious condition associated with COVID-19.

MIS-C is a new syndrome, and many questions remain about why some children develop it after a COVID-19 illness or contact with someone with COVID-19, while others do not.

Case Definition for Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C)

  • An individual aged <21 years presenting with fever, laboratory evidence of inflammation, and evidence of clinically severe illness requiring hospitalization, with multisystem (>2) organ involvement (cardiac, renal, respiratory, hematologic, gastrointestinal, dermatologic or neurological); AND
  • No alternative plausible diagnoses; AND
  • Positive for current or recent SARS-CoV-2 infection by RT-PCR, serology, or antigen test; or COVID-19 exposure within the 4 weeks prior to the onset of symptoms

Fever >38.0°C for ≥24 hours, or report of subjective fever lasting ≥24 hours
Including, but not limited to, one or more of the following: an elevated C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), fibrinogen, procalcitonin, d-dimer, ferritin, lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH), or interleukin 6 (IL-6), elevated neutrophils, reduced lymphocytes, and low albumin

Additional comments

  • Some individuals may fulfill full or partial criteria for Kawasaki disease but should be reported if they meet the case definition for MIS-C
  • Consider MIS-C in any pediatric death with evidence of SARS-CoV-2 infection

As of 9/3/2020, CDC has received reports of 792 confirmed cases of MIS-C and 16 deaths in 42 states, New York City, and Washington, DC. Additional cases are under investigation.

  • Most cases are in children between the ages of 1 and 14 years, with an average age of 8 years.
  • Cases have occurred in children from <1 year old to 20 years old.
  • More than 70% of reported cases have occurred in children who are Hispanic/Latino (276 cases) or Non-Hispanic Black (230 cases).
  • 99% of cases (783) tested positive for SARS CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The remaining 1% were around someone with COVID-19.
  • Most children developed MIS-C 2-4 weeks after infection with SARS-CoV-2.
  • Slightly more than half (54%) of reported cases were male.
Race & Ethnicity: Hispanic or Latino: 41 percent; Non Hispanic Black: 34 percent; Non Hispanic White: 13 percent; Other: 5 percent; Multiple: 4 percent; Asian: 2 percent; American Indian/Alaskan Native: 1 percent
Race and Ethnicity of Reported MIS-C Cases